Archive for April, 2009

Flyfishing for Sail fish in Guatemala

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

There is much we could write, and much left to be written………..about flyfishing for large pelagic sail fish in Guatemala. Such topics as the right tippet, knots, hooks to use (single ? double ??), hook setting etc etc………..but in the end probably the most important factor in at least getting a bite out of a lit up sail fish is what you land in front of him at the stern.

About half of our clients now exclusively flyfish when they come fishing to Guatemala – and we have seen all kinds of great gear. Often, inside the gear box is a grand assortment of flies, some tied lovingly by hand.

We used to carry a decent selection on our boats as well – but after years of testing and observing, we now carry only two…………and they are the same fly just in two color options. As far as I know, just about every charter operator in the region, when pressed, will vouch for the same fly – Cam Sigler in pink&white. Save some baggage space – this is what the fish want !!

 

Oh ! and the other fly ??…………..Cam Sigler popper in Chartreuse.

When you come to Guatemala fishing…….

Monday, April 20th, 2009

The good news is that the new airport terminal in Guatemala City (La Aurora, GUA) is just about finished. For anyone who hasn’t visited for a couple of years – you will hardly recognize the place !

 

The government made a strategic investment to try and develop the region into a Central America hub for air transport – and has so invested heavily in the airport itself as well as surrounding infrastructure such as parking and arrivals. The new terminal is a modern masterpiece of steel and glass, and certainly wouldn’t be out of place in any capital city in the world. The arrivals process has also been significantly streamlined and modernized.

 

MOST IMPORTANT however when travelling to Guatemala for fishing is to MAKE SURE that you passport has AT LEAST 6 months validity left before renewal. The immigration officers play it strictly by the book, and do not hesitate to put arriving passengers on the next available flight home if their documentation and in particular their passport validity is not up to date. Do it well in advance !!

It’s not JUST fishing in Guatemala !

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

About Antigua Guatemala
We are often asked by our clients about side trips or laydays when fishing with us in Guatemala. Probably the easiest of these logistically is a day trip (45 minutes each way) from the coast to Antigua .
La Antigua Guatemala means the “Old Guatemala” and was the third capital of Guatemala. Established in 1543 by the Spanish Conquisadors, it was originally named Santiago de los Caballeros (Knights of St James) from the original Capital of Ciudad de Santiago de los Caballeros de Goathemalan. It served as the centre of governance for the “Spanish Colony of Guatemala” for almost 200 years -which at the time consisted of almost all of present day Central America as well as the southern part of Mexico.
A series of earthquakes that started in 1717, but culminated in a set of large earthquakes in 1773 caused the Spanish Crown to mandate the move of the capital to a safer location (present day Guatemala City) in 1776.
The badly damaged city of Santiago de los Caballeros was ordered abandoned, although not everyone left, and was referred to as la Antigua Guatemala, or Old Guatemala. The population had peaked in the 1770’s at around 60,000 – but today’s residents number about half that.
La Antigua is noted for its very elaborate religious celebrations during Lent (Cuaresma), leading up to Holy Week (Semana Santa) and Easter (Pascua). Each Sunday in Lent, one on the local churches and parishes sponsor a series of processions through the streets of Antigua. This is by far the most popular week of the year to visit Antigua, and travellers can expect an extreme shortage of good accommodation – as well as restrictions in the town for parking and access – given the crowds.
Antigua is also well known for its Spanish Schools (over 100 at last count), and for its “cosmopolitan” ambience – with restaurants and bars that serve the tourist population, and are rarely seen in other towns and villages outside the Capital.