Archive for the ‘guatemala fishing’ Category

Roads in Guatemala

Sunday, September 6th, 2009
Roads in Guatemala

There is already a 4-lane highway from Guatemala City to the Pacific coast that makes fishing in Guatemala convenient to access for international visitors.

Until now, it has been the only such road in the country, and has greatly facilited the development and ease of access for fishing for sailfish in Guatemala on the West coast.

 

Now a new project is about to begin that may offer the same benfits on the East coast. The government just announced that construction of  the mega-highway project Franja Transversal del Norte, FTN will begin in Guatemala in late October.
In his radio program on Wednesday: Despacho Presidencial, Colom once more defended that project due to the benefit it brings to more than half a million residents in the adjoining regions – and potentially opening up the Caribbean side of the country to visiting anglers as well.

Project-FTN, a dream of decades ago will soon come true in late October, Guatemala leader said.

Franja Transversal del Norte is a mega-highway project that will cross Guatemala from the Atlantic Ocean, which is at the east of this country, across four departments (provinces) to the border with Mexico in the west.

 The road will have an approximate length of 226 miles and is expected to be finished by Dec. 2011.

http://greatsailfishing.com/

 
 

Calm seas attract anglers to fish in Guatemala

Monday, August 31st, 2009

Guatemala boasts some of the world’s most consistently flat seas – often as far out as 50 miles it can be calm and almost like a lake. Observing the geography of the coastline, you can see how the waters form a large protected bowl with Mexico at the top and Panama at the bottom. This  combined with the protection offered from the prevailing winds by the highlands and the ridge of volcanoes means that the coast and coastal waters are almost wind free on a year round basis, with late February through May almost guaranteeing flat seas.

During the dry season – and the height of the sailfishing season of November – May, it is highly unusual to see any problems with weather impacting the sportfishing fleet’s ability to leave the dock. Even during the wet season, the weather offshore can vary significantly to the coastal weather – but there is certainly a greater propensity for weather delays or to be “blown out” in the Summer months.

Remember however that just when the wind is providing some cooling effects while fishing – this is no time to relax the regimen of high factor sun protection……….this is a must when fishing offshore all year round in Guatemala, along with high quality sunglasses and a wide brimmed hat for screening your head.

Free guide to fishing in Guatemala

Saturday, August 22nd, 2009

We have just released our complete Fishing guide to Guatemala.

Over 40 pages packed with information and tips on your fishing trip to Guatemala. The book is organised into 16 chapters that cover everything from fishing technique for sailfish and marlin – both flyfishing for sailfish and conventional fishing – to accommodation options, transport, tips and culture and other potential excursions.

This 40 page fishing guide is your absolutely free. Simply click on the graphic below to receive instructions on how to receive it instantly – and best of all it is absolutely free with no obligation whatsoever !

 

FREE Fishing guide to Guatemala

FREE Fishing guide to Guatemala

Single Angler fishing in Guatemala

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Greatsailfishing in Guatemala has launched a program to enable single anglers or small groups the opportunity to register and combine a trip with other similar minded anglers.

Frequently the cost of billfishing in Guatemala and other locales can become prohibitive when fishing alone. The only practical way to significantly reduce the individual cost is to find like minded fellow anglers to share a trip. This can be difficult, but Greatsailfishing is now trying to make it easy(er) – register for a trip and we will circulate dates that you can consider – if there is a match, we will attempt to “hook you up” with others and build a shared trip.

 

All anglers will benefit from their own bedroom (and usually a private bathroom) in one of our private villas. All meals, drinks and transfers are included.

 

For more and complete information visit :

 

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/guatemala_fishing_sharing.html

Flyfishing technique for Sailfishing in Guatemala

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

We now use almost exclusively beak hooks either in single or tandem configuration with our flyfishing setus un Guatemala. We have of course always used circle hooks for our conventional fishing in Guatemala – as is required by law in Guatemala.

 

The hooks with the “upturned beaks” – but you have to be careful not to  bury the hook eye too far into the tube for this hook design, in essence shortening the distance between the clumsy popper head and the point of the hook thus interfering with hook point to flesh contact.  That’s not a good thing, and, further to that, the hook point then tends to ride a little bit more upwards, effectively creating an even shorter gap length furthering the potential for “slipping” and missing upon using the more traditional hook setting methods.

 

Something learned the hard way about a sailfish and how it eats a fly – advice from another famous billfishing  captain : never, ever keep a fly in front of a sailfish, this is the fastest way to lose the attention of the fish and all of the effort teasing and reteasing will have been for nought. If you do succeed in hooking up – the prognosis is still not good, and believe me, can be extremely frustrating !

 

  When the cast is mis-placed into the oncoming path of the fish, always take it away and recast the fly rather than go through the inevitable frustration of another unbuttoned sailfish . . . sometimes 5 seconds into the fight, sometime 30 minutes into it, but almost always, the fish that eats that fly straight on comes undone or is bill-hooked.  This advice mind you, came after many years fly fishing for sails. If you think back to how many of your straight-on shots came undone, and the honest answer was likely, most of them. 

When the fly is eaten head on or quartering to, the best approach is to lift it up and throw it beyond the fish.  All you have to remember is to keep your line from landing on top of them or being too close to them when they turn on the fly.

 

More detail, information yips – and an extensive article on this and other topics can be found at :

 

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/Sailfishing%20flyfishing%20technique.html

It’s not JUST fishing in Guatemala !

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

About Antigua Guatemala
We are often asked by our clients about side trips or laydays when fishing with us in Guatemala. Probably the easiest of these logistically is a day trip (45 minutes each way) from the coast to Antigua .
La Antigua Guatemala means the “Old Guatemala” and was the third capital of Guatemala. Established in 1543 by the Spanish Conquisadors, it was originally named Santiago de los Caballeros (Knights of St James) from the original Capital of Ciudad de Santiago de los Caballeros de Goathemalan. It served as the centre of governance for the “Spanish Colony of Guatemala” for almost 200 years -which at the time consisted of almost all of present day Central America as well as the southern part of Mexico.
A series of earthquakes that started in 1717, but culminated in a set of large earthquakes in 1773 caused the Spanish Crown to mandate the move of the capital to a safer location (present day Guatemala City) in 1776.
The badly damaged city of Santiago de los Caballeros was ordered abandoned, although not everyone left, and was referred to as la Antigua Guatemala, or Old Guatemala. The population had peaked in the 1770’s at around 60,000 – but today’s residents number about half that.
La Antigua is noted for its very elaborate religious celebrations during Lent (Cuaresma), leading up to Holy Week (Semana Santa) and Easter (Pascua). Each Sunday in Lent, one on the local churches and parishes sponsor a series of processions through the streets of Antigua. This is by far the most popular week of the year to visit Antigua, and travellers can expect an extreme shortage of good accommodation – as well as restrictions in the town for parking and access – given the crowds.
Antigua is also well known for its Spanish Schools (over 100 at last count), and for its “cosmopolitan” ambience – with restaurants and bars that serve the tourist population, and are rarely seen in other towns and villages outside the Capital.

Good news for Guatemala fishing and Costa Rica Fishing

Monday, January 26th, 2009

We had a couple of snippets/updates of good news this week for our support of a total ban on killing billfish including Marlin and Sailfish in all waters from the Atlantic to Pacific.

The government of Costa Rica may votes as early as this week on the improved regulations that we have reported and discussed here ……. and we also learned of a campaign that is gathering publicity and steam to incite a public boycott in the USA of menus that support dishes of Marlin meat.

 

The goal of the organisation is to enlist the support of all stakeholders (excuse the ugly pun) from chefs to restaurant owners to diners – and to convince them that it is better for all – economically and ethically – so not serve Marlin at all…….and ideally not to serve any billfish whatsoever.

 

The GreatSailfishing Company encourages you to voice your support – and to spread the word !!

 

logN