Posts Tagged ‘fishing guatemala’

La Quema del Diablo

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

This is a time of year that hopefully everyone is in good spirits as we approach the festive season. There are few peoples that enjoy a good celebration than the indigenous Guatemaltecos – and why stop at one ?? La Quema del Diablo (The burning of the devil) is a day that dates back as far as the 18th century, and is a combination of the pragmatic (take out household detritus and burn it) and culture whereby the act of burning represents the purging of evil. It is centered in Antigua in front of the Convent of Conception as locals erect an effigy of Lucifer and set it ablaze…………accompanied by fireworks that start around 6pm and continue pretty much uninterrupted all night as the crowds move from the North of the city to the “Old Capital” just outside Antigua proper.
It is not a coincidence that the Fiesta immediately precedes the Fiesta de La Virgen de Inmaculada Concepción Fas it also represents the struggle of the Virgin of the Immaculate Conception with the devil throughout her life. The Virgin is a very special saint for Guatemala – she was declared patron Saint of Guatemala City as early as 1738, and patron Saint of the Americas by Charles III in 1756. From the start of December until Semana Santa (Holy Week), there is no shortage of festivities to observe if you care to take a break from fishing for a day.

Calm seas attract anglers to fish in Guatemala

Monday, August 31st, 2009

Guatemala boasts some of the world’s most consistently flat seas – often as far out as 50 miles it can be calm and almost like a lake. Observing the geography of the coastline, you can see how the waters form a large protected bowl with Mexico at the top and Panama at the bottom. This  combined with the protection offered from the prevailing winds by the highlands and the ridge of volcanoes means that the coast and coastal waters are almost wind free on a year round basis, with late February through May almost guaranteeing flat seas.

During the dry season – and the height of the sailfishing season of November – May, it is highly unusual to see any problems with weather impacting the sportfishing fleet’s ability to leave the dock. Even during the wet season, the weather offshore can vary significantly to the coastal weather – but there is certainly a greater propensity for weather delays or to be “blown out” in the Summer months.

Remember however that just when the wind is providing some cooling effects while fishing – this is no time to relax the regimen of high factor sun protection……….this is a must when fishing offshore all year round in Guatemala, along with high quality sunglasses and a wide brimmed hat for screening your head.

Free guide to fishing in Guatemala

Saturday, August 22nd, 2009

We have just released our complete Fishing guide to Guatemala.

Over 40 pages packed with information and tips on your fishing trip to Guatemala. The book is organised into 16 chapters that cover everything from fishing technique for sailfish and marlin – both flyfishing for sailfish and conventional fishing – to accommodation options, transport, tips and culture and other potential excursions.

This 40 page fishing guide is your absolutely free. Simply click on the graphic below to receive instructions on how to receive it instantly – and best of all it is absolutely free with no obligation whatsoever !

 

FREE Fishing guide to Guatemala

FREE Fishing guide to Guatemala

Guatemala Fishing report August 10th 2009

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

Barry Jackson and Ron Corsan  fished with us this week and had what has become a “typical” days fishing for recent weeks – raising 5 sailfish and lots of Dorado (even had a Wahoo in the mix !). They both hail from Texas and are avid redfishermen -so sails and wahoo was a high speed change for them ! They are down in Guatemala helping out on a mission to support an orphanage, but managed to find the time to spend a day with us at the coast fishing – we sent them home with a five gallon bucket of fresh fish to share at their table……………….for the full fishing report read here :

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/2008-9_Guatemala_Fishing_Report.html

Single Angler fishing in Guatemala

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Greatsailfishing in Guatemala has launched a program to enable single anglers or small groups the opportunity to register and combine a trip with other similar minded anglers.

Frequently the cost of billfishing in Guatemala and other locales can become prohibitive when fishing alone. The only practical way to significantly reduce the individual cost is to find like minded fellow anglers to share a trip. This can be difficult, but Greatsailfishing is now trying to make it easy(er) – register for a trip and we will circulate dates that you can consider – if there is a match, we will attempt to “hook you up” with others and build a shared trip.

 

All anglers will benefit from their own bedroom (and usually a private bathroom) in one of our private villas. All meals, drinks and transfers are included.

 

For more and complete information visit :

 

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/guatemala_fishing_sharing.html

Flyfishing technique for Sailfishing in Guatemala

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

We now use almost exclusively beak hooks either in single or tandem configuration with our flyfishing setus un Guatemala. We have of course always used circle hooks for our conventional fishing in Guatemala – as is required by law in Guatemala.

 

The hooks with the “upturned beaks” – but you have to be careful not to  bury the hook eye too far into the tube for this hook design, in essence shortening the distance between the clumsy popper head and the point of the hook thus interfering with hook point to flesh contact.  That’s not a good thing, and, further to that, the hook point then tends to ride a little bit more upwards, effectively creating an even shorter gap length furthering the potential for “slipping” and missing upon using the more traditional hook setting methods.

 

Something learned the hard way about a sailfish and how it eats a fly – advice from another famous billfishing  captain : never, ever keep a fly in front of a sailfish, this is the fastest way to lose the attention of the fish and all of the effort teasing and reteasing will have been for nought. If you do succeed in hooking up – the prognosis is still not good, and believe me, can be extremely frustrating !

 

  When the cast is mis-placed into the oncoming path of the fish, always take it away and recast the fly rather than go through the inevitable frustration of another unbuttoned sailfish . . . sometimes 5 seconds into the fight, sometime 30 minutes into it, but almost always, the fish that eats that fly straight on comes undone or is bill-hooked.  This advice mind you, came after many years fly fishing for sails. If you think back to how many of your straight-on shots came undone, and the honest answer was likely, most of them. 

When the fly is eaten head on or quartering to, the best approach is to lift it up and throw it beyond the fish.  All you have to remember is to keep your line from landing on top of them or being too close to them when they turn on the fly.

 

More detail, information yips – and an extensive article on this and other topics can be found at :

 

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/Sailfishing%20flyfishing%20technique.html

Guatemala Fishing report June7th 2009

Thursday, June 11th, 2009

Over the course of the years, I have heard many debates and even some arguments about whether the rain affects the fishing…………..positively or negatively. I guess my conclusion after listening and in some cases partaking in these debates is that “it depends”………………so it is with much of fishing, and with most of the variables involved. The weather offshore has been relatively kind. Some showers, even the odd thunderhead thrown in – but nothing good size sportfishing boats can’t handle with ease and almost comfort. The seas have been rolling as much as 4-6ft – which is unusual even for this time of year – but sometimes that is what it takes to literally “shake things up” and get the fish to bite. Our most recent trips have reported some great and consistent bites on BIG Blue Marlin. Our Blues generally average in the 300-450lb class……..but these have been averaging considerably more, maybe 500+ and as high as 650lbs or so.

read the full report here :

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/weeklyfishing.htm

Some progress in Costa Rica for Sportfishing for Sailfish

Thursday, June 11th, 2009

Whatever happens to support fishing for sailfish in Costa Rica naturally has implications for sailfishing in Guatemala – so we keep a close ear to any glimmer of hope for progress that supports the industry and as a consequence fishing for pelagic fish such as sailfish and Blue Marlin in Guatemala.There continues to be some progress, albeit slow with regards to legislation – or at least some agreed objectives to support and promote sportfishing in Costa Rica – and therefore as a byproduct support of sportfishing up and down the Central American Pacific coast.

Latest progress – as recent as last week – was that officials from local and national fishing organizations and conservation groups met in the town hall in Puerto Jimenez to format a plan that would make the area a “marine area of responsible fishing” (AMPR). If the plan goes forward, in two-and-a-half-years  it would eliminate shrimp trawlers from the area and the main focus would be conducting biological studies and teaching gillnet fishermen how to use sustainable fishing practices.

The trawlers, gill nets and longlines collectively pose the greatest threat to the ecosystem that supports and promotes the pelagic fishery – so we regard this (or any similar !) as a step in the right direction.

The Costa Rican Federation for Fishing Tourism (FECOPT) officials presented the outline of a plan to some of the directors of the National Fisheries Institute (INCOPESCA) and members of the National Artisanal Fishing Federation. And all seemed to have one goal, removing fishing nets from the gulf.

Now for the longlines…………

Thankfully our fishing remains strong – read our latest fishing report here :

http://www.greatsailfishing.com/en/weeklyfishing.htm

Flyfishing for Sail fish in Guatemala

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

There is much we could write, and much left to be written………..about flyfishing for large pelagic sail fish in Guatemala. Such topics as the right tippet, knots, hooks to use (single ? double ??), hook setting etc etc………..but in the end probably the most important factor in at least getting a bite out of a lit up sail fish is what you land in front of him at the stern.

About half of our clients now exclusively flyfish when they come fishing to Guatemala – and we have seen all kinds of great gear. Often, inside the gear box is a grand assortment of flies, some tied lovingly by hand.

We used to carry a decent selection on our boats as well – but after years of testing and observing, we now carry only two…………and they are the same fly just in two color options. As far as I know, just about every charter operator in the region, when pressed, will vouch for the same fly – Cam Sigler in pink&white. Save some baggage space – this is what the fish want !!

 

Oh ! and the other fly ??…………..Cam Sigler popper in Chartreuse.

It’s not JUST fishing in Guatemala !

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

About Antigua Guatemala
We are often asked by our clients about side trips or laydays when fishing with us in Guatemala. Probably the easiest of these logistically is a day trip (45 minutes each way) from the coast to Antigua .
La Antigua Guatemala means the “Old Guatemala” and was the third capital of Guatemala. Established in 1543 by the Spanish Conquisadors, it was originally named Santiago de los Caballeros (Knights of St James) from the original Capital of Ciudad de Santiago de los Caballeros de Goathemalan. It served as the centre of governance for the “Spanish Colony of Guatemala” for almost 200 years -which at the time consisted of almost all of present day Central America as well as the southern part of Mexico.
A series of earthquakes that started in 1717, but culminated in a set of large earthquakes in 1773 caused the Spanish Crown to mandate the move of the capital to a safer location (present day Guatemala City) in 1776.
The badly damaged city of Santiago de los Caballeros was ordered abandoned, although not everyone left, and was referred to as la Antigua Guatemala, or Old Guatemala. The population had peaked in the 1770’s at around 60,000 – but today’s residents number about half that.
La Antigua is noted for its very elaborate religious celebrations during Lent (Cuaresma), leading up to Holy Week (Semana Santa) and Easter (Pascua). Each Sunday in Lent, one on the local churches and parishes sponsor a series of processions through the streets of Antigua. This is by far the most popular week of the year to visit Antigua, and travellers can expect an extreme shortage of good accommodation – as well as restrictions in the town for parking and access – given the crowds.
Antigua is also well known for its Spanish Schools (over 100 at last count), and for its “cosmopolitan” ambience – with restaurants and bars that serve the tourist population, and are rarely seen in other towns and villages outside the Capital.